Tag Archives: roundup

March 2018, Roundup

The month of:

Women, International Women’s Day, Women’s History Month

Questions and Answers

10 Questions About Women’s History
Answers

Gold Stars

Helen Leonard
Women’s Electoral Lobby
Australian Women’s History Forum
Australian Women’s History Network

People

Fernand Braudel, Caitlin Davies, Emily Davison, Charles Dickens, Miles Franklin, Clara Lemlich, Helen Leonard, Gerda Lerner, Muriel Matters, Emmeline Pankhurst, Bessie Rischbieth, Joan Wallach Scott, E.P. Thompson, Robert Wainwright, Alfred North Whitehead, Mary Wollstonecraft, Clare Wright

Places

Broken Hill, California, Copenhagen, London, New York

Events

1902: Australia grants women the right to vote and stand for election.
1908: Protest by Muriel Matters at the House of Commons; New York garment worker’s strike.
1909: First Women’s Day; Uprising of the 20,000 New York shirtwaist worker’s strike; Muriel Matters flies across London dropping Votes for Women handbills.
1911: Triangle Shirtwaist Fire.
1913: Emily Davison’s death at the Epsom Derby; Bessie Rischbieth witnesses the Suffragette movement.
1918: Representation of the People Act passed.
1928: Equal Franchise Act passed.
1962: Indigenous Australian women and men granted national voting rights.

Organisations

Australian Women’s History Network
British Library
eScholarship Research Centre
Muriel Matters Society Inc
National Archives (UK)
National Centre of Biography
National Foundation for Australian Women
Parliament (UK)
School of Historical and Philosophical Studies
State Library of Victoria

Resources

Australian Dictionary of Biography
Australian women at war
Australian women’s history network resources
Australian Women’s Register
Biography of Clara Lemlich
Birth of a Nation? by Clare Wright
Canberra women in World War I
Encyclopedia history of women and leadership in twentieth-century Australia
Gender history in Australasia readings
Indigenous Australia
Labour Australia
Lilith: A Feminist History Journal
Muriel Matters TV movie
National History Challenge
Obituaries Australia
People Australia
Pictures (State Library of Victoria)
She’s Game: Women Making Australian Sporting History
Suffrage 100, The National Archives, UK
Suffragette movie
UN Timeline
Troves Digitised Newspapers
VIDA: Blog of the Australian Women’s History Network
Votes for Women, British Library
Women and the Vote, UK Parliament
Women’s Archives Project
Women Australia

Books

Bad Girls : A History of Rebels and Renegades by Caitlin Davies
Miss Muriel Matters : The fearless suffragist who fought for equality by Robert Wainwright

Quotes

I am afflicted with the power of thought, which is a heavy curse. The less a person thinks and inquires regarding the why and the wherefore and the justice of things, when dragging along through life, the happier it is for him, and doubly, trebly so, for her
— Miles Franklin

The deepest definition of youth is life as yet untouched by tragedy.
— Alfred North Whitehead

Women ought to have representatives, instead of being arbitrarily governed without any direct share allowed them in the deliberations of government.
— Mary Wollstonecraft

Happiness, whether in business or private life, leaves very little trace in history.
— Fernand Braudel

Those who expect moments of change to be comfortable and free of conflict have not learned their history.
— Joan Wallach Scott

Everything that explains the world has in fact explained a world that does not exist, a world in which men are at the centre of the human enterprise and women are at the margin ‘helping’ them. Such a world does not exist — never has.
— Gerda Lerner

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of light, it was the season of darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair.
― Charles Dickens

I am seeking to rescue the poor stockinger, the Luddite cropper, the “obsolete” hand-loom weaver, the “utopian” artisan, and even the deluded follower of Joanna Southcott, from the enormous condescension of posterity. Their crafts and traditions may have been dying. Their hostility to the new industrialism may have been backward-looking. Their communitarian ideals may have been fantasies. Their insurrectionary conspiracies may have been foolhardy. But they lived through these times of acute social disturbance, and we did not. Their aspirations were valid in terms of their own experience; and if they were casualties of history, they remain, condemned in their own lives, as casualties. ― E.P. Thompson

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February 2018, Roundup

People

Jane Austen, Heather Blasdale Clarke,  Marcus Clarke, Henry Steel Commager, Niall Ferguson, Ernest Hemingway, William Shakespeare, Laurel Thatcher Ulrich

Organisations

Melbourne Museum
National Museum of Australia
Powerhouse Museum
Sydney Living Museums

Exhibitions

Love Is… Australian Wedding Fashion
WW1: Love & Sorrow

Resources

Australian Colonial Dance
Close to the heart
Convict love tokens
Love and Sorrow
Powerhouse Museum’s collection
Troves Digitised Newspapers

Book

For the Term of His Natural Life

Quotes

If people bring so much courage to this world the world has to kill them to break them, so of course it kills them. The world breaks every one and afterward many are strong at the broken places. But those that will not break it kills. It kills the very good and the very gentle and the very brave impartially. If you are none of these you can be sure it will kill you too but there will be no special hurry.
― Ernest Hemingway

The law of unintended consequences is the only real law of history.
— Niall Ferguson

Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind, And therefore is winged Cupid painted blind.
― William Shakespeare

This is what really happened, reported by a free press to a free people.  It is the raw material of history; it is the story of our own times.
— Henry Steel Commager

To be fond of dancing was a certain step towards falling in love
― Jane Austen

History is a conversation and sometimes a shouting match between present and past, though often the voices we most want to hear are barely audible.
— Laurel Thatcher Ulrich

January 2018, Roundup

People

Ralph Abernathy, Fiona Baverstock, Vera Brittain, Edmund Burke, Robin G. Collingwood, Elsie Dalyell, John Devoy, Peter Englund, Miles Franklin, Vida Goldstein, Kaiser Wilhelm II, Martin Luther King, Jr., Richard Reid, Ettie Rout, Marion Leane Smith, G. M. Trevelyan, Laurel Thatcher Ulrich, James Wilson, Virginia Woolf

Places

Fremantle, Royaumont, Malta, Trinidad, Salonika, Istanbul, Egypt, England, Canada, New Zealand, Melbourne, United States, Russia, Belarus, Italy, Iraq, France, Macedonia, Malta and Salonika

Events

1868: The last convicts arrived at Fremantle, Western Australia.
1874: James Wilson, one of the last convicts, writes to Fenian leader John Devoy.
1876: The Catalpa rescue — the liberation of six Fenian convicts from Fremantle gaol.
1915: New Zealand Volunteer Sisterhood set up by Ettie Rout is in Egypt.
1917: Ettie Rout’s prophylactic kit is sold at New Zealand Soldiers’ Clubs in England.
1918: First World War Armistice.
1919: Dr Elsie Dalyell awarded the OBE.
Also see military anniversaries in History, war and remembering in 2018

Organisations

Australian War Memorial

 Resources

Troves Digitised Newspapers
Women of Empire 1914-1918
Dressing Australia Museum of Costume
Women of Empire Stories

Books

The Beauty and the Sorrow
Sinners, Saints & Settlers

Quotes

Whoever undertakes to set himself up as a judge of Truth and Knowledge is shipwrecked by the laughter of the gods. —Edmund Burke

But though kind Time may many joys renew, There is one greatest joy I shall not know Again, because my heart for loss of You Was broken, long ago. — Vera Brittain

Well-behaved women seldom make history. ― Laurel Thatcher Ulrich

If one could make alive again for other people some cobwebbed skein of old dead intrigues and breathe breath and character into dead names and stiff portraits. That is history to me! — G. M. Trevelyan

We are not makers of history. We are made by history. — Martin Luther King, Jr.

Every new generation must rewrite history in its own way. — Robin G. Collingwood

Now, dear friend, remember this is a voice from the tomb…we have been nearly nine years in this living tomb…it is impossible for mind or body to withstand the continual strain…one or the other must give away. — James Wilson

Gold Star

Fiona Baverstock and her husband Keith for their exhibition Women of Empire 1914-1918.

October 2017, Roundup: the whale cure, making history and Passchendaele

People

Nick Cave, Anne Curthoys, Anne McGrath, William Shakespeare

Places

Eden, New South Wales; Passchendaele, Belgium

Events

1917: the First Battle for Passchendaele; 1930: whaling ends at Eden

Organisations

Eden Killer Whale Museum

 Resources

Troves Digitised Newspapers
Writer’s Digest
Write Nonfiction in November (WNFIN) Challenge
Write Nonfiction Now
Reading list from the Nonfiction Authors Association

Books

How to Write History that People Want to Read

Quotes

Come sail your ships around me And burn your bridges down We make a little history, baby Every time you come around — Nick Cave

There are more things in Heaven and Earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy — William Shakespeare

September 2017, Roundup: songs, history buffs and the Russian Revolution

People

Cicero, George W. Bush, Larry David, Richard Fidler, Billy Joel, Toby Keith, Alicia Keys, Vladimir Lenin, Larry Levin, Martie Maguire, Natalie Maines, Emily Robison,
John Schumann, Paul Simon, Sister Sledge, John Spitzer, Bruce Springsteen,
Ronald G. Walters, Dan Wilson and Jay Z

Places

Istanbul, Turkey; Russia; the World Trade Centre, the Pentagon and rural Pennsylvania, United States of America

Events

1917: the Russian Revolution; 2001: 9/11; 2003: US led invasion of Iraq; 2006: Not Ready to Make Nice released; 2009: Empire State of Mind released; 2011: 9/11 ten-year anniversary

Resources

project1917
Making Sense of American Popular Song
Seinfeld Scripts
Soundtracks: Songs that Defined History

Books

Ghost Empire

Quotes

To be ignorant of what occurred before you were born is to remain always a child.
— Cicero

A lie told often enough becomes the truth.
— Vladimir Lenin

And the Anzac legends didn’t mention mud and blood and tears, and stories that my father told me never seemed quite real I caught some pieces in my back that I didn’t even feel… God help me, I was only nineteen.
— John Schumann

Forgive, sounds good Forget, I’m not sure I could They say time heals everything But I’m still waiting
— Natalie Maines, Martie Maguire, Emily Robison, and Dan Wilson

Can’t see nothin’ in front of me Can’t see nothin’ coming up behind I make my way through this darkness I can’t feel nothing but this chain that binds me Lost track of how far I’ve gone How far I’ve gone, how high I’ve climbed On my back’s a sixty pound stone On my shoulder a half mile line.
— Bruce Springsteen

August 2017, Roundup, Convicts and love tokens and the Great Strike of 1917

People

Thomas Alsop, Joan Beaumont, Ken Inglis, Thomas Keneally, Timothy Millett,
Babette Smith, Jack Thompson

Places

Jervis Bay and Randwick, New South Wales

Events

1788: first convicts transported to Australia; 1835: The Hive sank off the New South Wales coast; 1917: the Great Strike; 2008: Timothy Millett sells his convict love token collection to the National Museum of Australia

Organisations

National Museum of Australia (NMA)

Resources

National Museum of Australia’s Convict love tokens
Trading History
Who do you think you are

Books

The Australian Colonists
Australians: Origins to Eureka
The Luck of the Irish
Broken Nation

Quotes

The rose soon drupes & dies. The brier fades away. But my fond heart for you I love shall never go astray. —Thomas Alsop [had words engraved on 1833 love token]

May the rose of England never bud. The thistle of Scotland never grow. The harp of Ireland never play. Till I poor convict gain my liberty. —Anonymous

When this, you see remember me, and, bare, me in, your mind let, all, the, world say, what they, will speak of me, as, you find — Anonymous

July 2017, Roundup, Indigenous History

People

Ann Curthoys, John Docker, Shane Howard, Paul Keating, Eddie Mabo, James McPherson, Oodgeroo Noonuccal, Don Watson

Places

Gippsland, Victoria; Kakadu, Northern Territory; Murray Island, Queensland; Redfern, Walgett, Gulargambone, Kempsey, Bowraville and Moree, New South Wales

Events

At least 65,000 years ago: first time humans lived in Australia; Before the 1920’s: protests against Australia Day; 1965: the Freedom Ride; 1967: the Indigenous referendum; 1982: Solid Rock is a hit song; 1992: Paul Keating’s Redfern Speech and the Mabo decision.

Organisations

Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies (AIATSIS)
National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee (NAIDOC)
National Museum of Australia (NMA)

Resources

Indigenous moments
The 1965 Freedom Ride online exhibition
Reading list: Freedom Ride
Ann Curthoys’ diaries
Indigenous rights timeline
Brief history of NAIDOC week

Books

Caledonia Australis: Scottish highlanders on the frontier of Australia
Is History Fiction?
Freedom ride: a freedom rider remembers

Quotes

The most enduring reminders of the first people are made of the stone — freed from the bedrock and raised towards the sky; used as canvases for works of art; piled high as houses of the living and of the dead; scorched and cracked by home fires of long ago; chipped and polished as tools. — Neil Oliver

Revision is the lifeblood of historical scholarship. History is a continuing dialogue between the present and the past. Interpretations of the past are subject to change in response to new evidence, new questions asked of the evidence, new perspectives gained by the passage of time. There is no single, eternal, and immutable “truth” about past events and their meaning. The unending quest of historians for understanding the past—that is, “revisionism”—is what makes history vital and meaningful. — James McPherson

White Australia has a Black history. — Author unknown

Well they were standin’ on the shore one day Saw the white sails in the sun Wasn’t long before they felt the sting White man, white law, white gun Don’t tell me that it’s justified Cause somewhere someone lied Yeah, well someone lied Someone lied Genocide Well someone lied oh — Shane Howard

Imagine if ours was the oldest culture in the world and we were told that it was worthless. Imagine if we had resisted this settlement, suffered and died in the defence of our land, and then were told in history books that we had given up without a fight. Imagine if non-Aboriginal Australians had served their country in peace and war and were then ignored in history books. Imagine if our feats on sporting fields had inspired admiration and patriotism and yet did nothing to diminish prejudice. Imagine if our spiritual life was denied and ridiculed. Imagine if we had suffered the injustice and then were blamed for it. It seems to me that if we can imagine the injustice we can imagine its opposite. And we can have justice. — Paul Keating

Let no-one say the past is dead, the past is all about us and within. — Oodgeroo Noonuccal